Youssef M. Marzouk

Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics
Co-director, MIT Center for Computational Science and Engineering
Director, Aerospace Computational Design Laboratory
Pronouns He/His
With my students and other collaborators, I develop new methodologies for uncertainty quantification, Bayesian modeling and computation, data assimilation, experimental design, and machine learning in complex physical systems.

Contact Info

Office Phone

617.253.1337

Email

Office

Website/Lab

Administrative Contact

Jean Sofronas
617.258.5548

Financial Contact

Kim Ngan Le
617.324.5542

Specialization and Research Interests

Computational science and engineering, computational statistics. Uncertainty quantification, inverse problems, data assimilation. Energy and environment applications.

Teaching Interests

Computational mathematics, probability and statistics, fluid dynamics, aerodynamics, uncertainty quantification, stochastic modeling.

Academic Degrees

S.B., 1997, Massachusetts Institute of Technology S.M., 1999, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Ph.D., 2004, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Society Memberships

Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, American Statistical Association, International Society for Bayesian Analysis, American Geophysical Union

Positions Held at MIT

Assistant Professor, 2009-2012; Associate Professor, 2012-2020; Professor, 2020-present

Positions Held outside MIT

Sandia National Laboratories, 2004–2008

Biography

Youssef Marzouk is a professor in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT and co-director of the MIT Center for Computational Science and Engineering. He is also a core member of MIT’s Statistics and Data Science Center and director of MIT’s Aerospace Computational Design Laboratory. His research interests lie at the intersection of computation and statistical inference with physical modeling. He develops new methodologies for uncertainty quantification, Bayesian modeling and computation, data assimilation, experimental design, and machine learning in complex physical systems. His methodological work is motivated by a wide variety of engineering and environmental applications. He is an avid coffee drinker and occasional classical pianist.

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Awards & Honors

2018
Associate Fellow, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA)
2012
MIT Class of 1942 Career Development Chair
2012
MIT Junior Bose Award for Excellence in Teaching
2011
AIAA Undergraduate Teaching Award
2010
DOE Early Career Research Award
2004
Truman Fellow, Sandia National Laboratories
2004
Hertz Foundation Doctoral Thesis Prize
2004
Joseph H. Keenan Prize, MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering
1997
Hertz Fellow

Key publications